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JOSS ARNOTT DANCE TRIPLE BILL REVIEW

Explosive and atmospheric, Joss Arnott’s effortless choreography paired with the energy of the female dominated dancers fuelled a production like no other. Based in Huddersfield, Joss Arnott Dance academy brought an evening of classical contemporary dance to the seaside, with a sensual twist. Named the ‘Triple Bill’, the audience are exposed to 3 different approaches to contemporary dancing. The opening ‘A movement in 3’ had the most dancers on stage throughout the whole show. Although it never felt too overwhelming, the performers worked in unity together and created masterpieces of movement. Despite the majority of them appearing to be under the age of 18. It was delightful the way many of them could lift their athletic legs way above their heads. Group lifts were intriguing to watch and enhanced the excitement of the display. The music by composer Quinta had a strong rhythmic beat, that ricocheted off the walls as the pace built up, turning out to be rather catchy. However, the most intense point of the first act for me was unequivocally the intimate duet between violinist Fra Rustumji and a wonderfully gifted young dancer. As the violin sung its wistfully haunting tune, sinister shadows decorated the stage and architecture of the Grand Theatre, producing an eerie effect. The darkness of the stage thus illuminating the dancer and her delicate actions in the yellow glow of the spotlight. A unique scene to observe.

Feeling already captivated by the first half of Joss Arnott’s collaboration, I was pleasantly surprised to find that things could only get better. It certainly lived up to its title ‘RUSH’. An all female cast dressed in the most lovely warm coloured, slightly ragged, dresses, a different colour given to each lady. They were practically dancing human autumn leaves, that seemed to have a forest like entity in retrospect. The imperfect quality of the costumes exemplifying the near perfect movement. All 5 women had a solo opportunity yet when the group joined together, the true empowerment and liberation of the performers was felt (possibly throughout the entirety of Blackpool). They appeared to all share a modest confidence in the way they moved across the stage, whether it be alone or together. Again, shadow and lighting was a key element to the ambience of the theatre, amplifying the energy of these incredibly talented female dancers. Most notably when the smoke mixed with the harsh brightness of the white stage lights behind them.

In the audience there were those of all different ages and backgrounds. We were absolutely zoned in and appreciating the movement of the human body in front of us. A performance easily admired by anyone and an experience that leaves you in awe of the technical excellence involved in in such contemporary dance.

 

by Grand Young Reviewer Colby Thompson

 

Other blogs you may be interested in…

LOCAL DANCERS TAKE THE GRAND STAGE: click here.

RSC ERICA WHYMAN CAPTIVATES CROWED: click here.

GRAND YOUNG TECHNICIANS: click here.

 

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